Five reasons to consider a Montessori education

When our son Matthew, “The Great” turned three we knew the time had come for us to start talking about pre-k.  For us this was a big decision because our desire for our children is a great educational experience. So after many visits, conversations and even verbally committing to one school we came across a Montessori school.  I’m not going to lie my idea of Montessori was tree hugging children and parents.  In addition, the children run freely in the classroom and do whatever feels good to them at any point during the day.  However, my husband and I were blown away after our initial visit.  We knew this would be a place Matthew could learn and grow.

Why we chose Montessori

Practical life

Practical life is an area of Montessori where tasks such as sorting, folding, zipping, buttoning, cleaning, and polishing are completed.  These tasks require the mastery of both gross and fine motor skills which are key developmental tasks that will impact lifelong learning.  In addition, children are learning to be contributors to their world through the lenses of “chores” and responsibility.  

Community

Montessori fosters a sense of community.  Although Matthew was four years old he was in a class with children ages 3-5.  For the older children they are able to assist in the learning process which reinforces their skills and teaches them how to be role models at an early age.  For the younger children it provides examples that they can aspire too. A sense of community and one’s role in that community are fostered through play and learning. 

Independence

Matthew loved playing with the Matryoshka (stacking) dolls.  When he came into class he had the freedom to make choices about what skill or task he wanted to perform.  As he mastered that task his teacher would progress him to the next task. This gives the child a sense of independence and ownership over their learning experience.  Each day is different and it is dependent upon what the child wants to tackle for the day. Matthew continues to gravitate towards sorting and counting which has become a love for math. 

Individualized

No child is the same which means their learning experiences should allow for variation.   Matthew loves math but he does not like writing.  Mr. Walter, his wonderful teacher, really pulled out all the stops to help improve his writing ability.  They spent time with writing in the sand, tracing on clear paper, and developing his pincer grip to help Matthew grow confident and comfortable with writing.  In Montessori the child is encouraged to learn at their pace and are encouraged to learn through varied techniques specific to the child.

Interactive learning

As most boys, Matthew loves to use his hands whether it’s building, playing a video game or playing basketball. We knew that transitioning him from a home daycare to a traditional setting would be a challenge.  So we knew that the various stations and tasks would be a great fit for learning through play.  From reading to writing, science and math; he was able to learn via an interactive task.  This not only kept his interest but it kept him going back for more.  

Final thoughts

As parents we want the best for our children and education is a big part of the equation.  While I am not a Montessori expert I do know that this learning environment helped to shape Matthew’s learning experience.  I hope that you would consider Montessori as an education option for your little ones.


Felicia Tucker

Hi, my name is Felicia Tucker and I am a wife and mom of three. My world consists of fostering a healthy marriage and nurturing my children while integrating that into my career. It is never a dull moment! I am learning how to enjoy the small moments, not sweat the small stuff and go to sleep with the toys strewn over the living room floor.

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